Doing this for both of us.


Photoset

Sep 19, 2014
@ 11:30 pm
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catherineaddington:

I had kind of a nerd-out this morning. But I felt like everyone needed to know about this.

(via jasonalanclark)



Photo

Sep 19, 2014
@ 11:23 pm
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151 notes

thatsbutterbaby:

Honoré Daumier, Centaur Abducting a Woman, 1870

thatsbutterbaby:

Honoré Daumier, Centaur Abducting a Woman, 1870

(via the-unknown-friend)


Photo

Sep 19, 2014
@ 11:22 pm
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65 notes

blank-reality:

Austin Osman Spare - From Behind the Veil (1906)
https://www.facebook.com/blankrealities

blank-reality:

Austin Osman Spare - From Behind the Veil (1906)

https://www.facebook.com/blankrealities

(via the-unknown-friend)


Photoset

Sep 19, 2014
@ 11:21 pm
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1,545 notes

igamuinacra-merenptah:

nassadii:

thetwistedrope:

satdeshret:

inonibird:

Stick-Gods ~ Dark Side of the Moon

OH MY GODS

And this is why I tend to associate him with Mycroft.

.____. I didn’t realize Thoth was that terrifying….

All of the Netjeru are scary as fuck if they want to be. But Djehuty is extremely scary whenever someone tries to take the Book of Thoth. You should read the myth, its awesome. :3


Photo

Sep 19, 2014
@ 11:18 pm
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69 notes

perchten:

"Woman dressed as tree participate in "Kusta" tradition celebration, when woman dressed as tree together with people walk around the village with songs."
(Andrei Liankevich)

perchten:

"Woman dressed as tree participate in "Kusta" tradition celebration, when woman dressed as tree together with people walk around the village with songs."

(Andrei Liankevich)

(via the-unknown-friend)


Photo

Sep 19, 2014
@ 11:17 pm
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72 notes

danskjavlarna:

The Golden Fleece and the Heroes Who Lives Before Achilles by Padraic Colum, 1921.

danskjavlarna:

The Golden Fleece and the Heroes Who Lives Before Achilles by Padraic Colum, 1921.

(Source: oneletterwords.com, via the-unknown-friend)


Photo

Sep 19, 2014
@ 11:17 pm
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33 notes

akzoo:

Ernst Fuchs

akzoo:

Ernst Fuchs

(Source: jpsx, via the-unknown-friend)


Photo

Sep 19, 2014
@ 11:09 pm
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133 notes

slowlyeden:

Blood-Writing on one of the Dunhuang Buddhist Scrolls
At the turn of the twentieth century, thousands of manuscripts, known as the ‘Dunhuang Manuscripts’ were discovered in a walled-up library cave in Dunhuang, North-West China.
Among these were a set of Buddhist scrolls copied by a man in his eighties. The texts were linked by a similar colophon (writer’s signature), which identifies the man as the scribe and documents his advancing years. This unusual example (pictured above), held at the British Library, shows the man, aged 83, demonstrating his piety by copying out a Buddhist scripture in his own hand, using ink mixed with his own blood. It reads:
"Copied by an old man of 83, who pricked his own hand to draw blood [to write with], on the 2nd of the 2nd month of ‘bingyin’, the third year of Tianyou" (27 February, 906).
The manuscripts illustrate a widespread belief in Buddhist cultures that by copying, or commissioning a copy, of a Buddhist sutra, individuals would demonstrate their piety or devotion to the Dharma, or Buddhist doctrine, and in doing so accrue merit for their passage to the next life.
It was believed that by replicating the words or image of the Buddha one could not only demonstrate one’s own piety, but also improve the karmic lot of relatives and loved ones, alive or dead. To this end, the wealthy commissioned artists and craftsmen to decorate caves, create elaborate murals and copy out Buddhist scripture. The less wealthy spread the word via the oral traditions of storytelling and music, or by copying out scriptures in their own hand. The most pious sometimes gave their own blood to do so, as a particularly demonstrative way of gaining religious merit.
The practice of blood-writing seen in the scroll seems to have been uncommon in other Buddhist cultures; but in China it predated the appearance of Buddhism. Acts of self-mortification also extended to more extreme self-mutilation, such as the amputation of fingers or self-immolation as a means of expressing piety. This example is uncommon among the Dunhuang Manuscripts, but illustrates an important phenomenon among pious Chinese Buddhists which continued until the seventeenth century.
(Taken from the commentary by Abby Baker, The International Dunhuang Project, click through to original)

slowlyeden:

Blood-Writing on one of the Dunhuang Buddhist Scrolls

At the turn of the twentieth century, thousands of manuscripts, known as the ‘Dunhuang Manuscripts’ were discovered in a walled-up library cave in Dunhuang, North-West China.

Among these were a set of Buddhist scrolls copied by a man in his eighties. The texts were linked by a similar colophon (writer’s signature), which identifies the man as the scribe and documents his advancing years. This unusual example (pictured above), held at the British Library, shows the man, aged 83, demonstrating his piety by copying out a Buddhist scripture in his own hand, using ink mixed with his own blood. It reads:

"Copied by an old man of 83, who pricked his own hand to draw blood [to write with], on the 2nd of the 2nd month of ‘bingyin’, the third year of Tianyou" (27 February, 906).

The manuscripts illustrate a widespread belief in Buddhist cultures that by copying, or commissioning a copy, of a Buddhist sutra, individuals would demonstrate their piety or devotion to the Dharma, or Buddhist doctrine, and in doing so accrue merit for their passage to the next life.

It was believed that by replicating the words or image of the Buddha one could not only demonstrate one’s own piety, but also improve the karmic lot of relatives and loved ones, alive or dead. To this end, the wealthy commissioned artists and craftsmen to decorate caves, create elaborate murals and copy out Buddhist scripture. The less wealthy spread the word via the oral traditions of storytelling and music, or by copying out scriptures in their own hand. The most pious sometimes gave their own blood to do so, as a particularly demonstrative way of gaining religious merit.

The practice of blood-writing seen in the scroll seems to have been uncommon in other Buddhist cultures; but in China it predated the appearance of Buddhism. Acts of self-mortification also extended to more extreme self-mutilation, such as the amputation of fingers or self-immolation as a means of expressing piety. This example is uncommon among the Dunhuang Manuscripts, but illustrates an important phenomenon among pious Chinese Buddhists which continued until the seventeenth century.

(Taken from the commentary by Abby Baker, The International Dunhuang Project, click through to original)

(via v-v-f)


Link

Sep 19, 2014
@ 11:06 pm
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85 notes

Wisconsin Fraternity Allegedly Used Color-Coded System to Roofie Women »

(Source: micdotcom, via jasonalanclark)