Doing this for both of us.


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Sep 1, 2014
@ 9:48 pm
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136,816 notes

coldalbion:

mulatoomcmxci:

steppauseturnpausepivotstepstep:

babybutta:

yarrahs-life:

high-power-prolific:

thehereticpharaoh:

People really don’t believe Ancient Egyptians were ethnically African?

They referred to themselves, not as ”Egyptians” (a Greek term) , but as ”Kemmui’’, meaning, ”the blacks”.
The country itself they called, Kemet, or black nation.
'Kem' is the term for black in the ancient Egyptian language. It is represented in hieroglyphs by a stick charred at both ends.”
"km.t, the name of Ancient Egypt in Egyptian; Egypt (Coptic: Kemi)
r n km.t, the native term for the Egyptian language
(Ref: The Egyptian Hieroglyphic Dictionary, Vols 1&2, E.A. Budge, Dover.) 
Note: words inside brackets are the determinatives or word classifiers along with their English meanings.
Kem, kame, kmi, kmem, kmom = to be black 
Kememu = Black people (Ancient Egyptians) in both Ancient and modern Egyptian (Kmemou).
Kem [khet][wood] = extremely black, jet-black
Kemet = any black thing. Note: “t” is silent - pronounced Kemé
Kemet [nu][community, settlement, nation] = Black nation = Ancient Egypt.  
Kemet [Romé][people] = Black people. Ancient Egyptians. 
Kemit [Shoit][books] = Black books, Ancient Egyptian literature.  
Kem wer [miri][large body of water] = The Great Black sea (The Red sea). This sea is neither black nor red, this is in reference to which nation, Black or Red, at a particular time, controlled this body of water. 
Kemi fer = Black double house; seat of government. Note: by reference to Wolof again, we know that to make a plural of per or house, the “p” becomes an “f” or fer. Thus fero=great houses (double), it is not pero as Budge writes.
In Ancient Egyptian, the ordinary adjective always follows the noun it modifies, whereas a sanctified adjective usually comes before its noun.  The sanctified adjectives are:
Kem —  Black
Suten -  Royal
Nter —-  Holy, Sacred
Examples:
Kem ti = Black image, sacred image : ti oubash = white image  
Kem ho = Black face/title of a god   : ho oubash = white face  
Kem ta = Black land, holy land        : Ta deshret = Red land (also; Ta Sett) 
This rule does not apply when Black is used as a noun-adjective of nationality:  
Hompt Kemet = copper of Black; Egyptian copper :  Hompt Sett = copper of the Red nations; Asiatic copper  
Ro in Kemet (page 416a) = speech of Black; mute ro n Kemet = word of the mouth of Black; the Egyptian language
Kemet Deshret = Black and Red; good and evil; fertile and barren, etc.; Duality  
Deshretu (page 554a,b) = red ones, red devils.  Used also to refer to the Namu and Tamhu; not a complimentary label. 
African Origins: 
The following Ancient Egyptian words acknowledge the origins of Pharaonic Egyptian civilization; 
Khentu Hon Nefer (page 554a) = founders of the Excellent Order. Budge: “peoples and tribes of Nubia and the Egyptian Sudan.” For “Hon” see page 586b. 
Hon Nefer (page 1024b) = Excellent Order
Kenus (page1024b) = mighty; brave (from Kenu, page 772a)
Ta Khent (page 1051b/page 554b) = land of the beginning.  
Eau (page 952b/page 17b) = the old country  
Ancient Egyptian’s Worldview:  
The Egyptian’s view of the world was the exact opposite of the current Western one. To the Egyptian, the top of the world was in the south (upper) towards the African interior, the bottom (lower) towards the north, hence upper and lower Egypt; upper and lower Syria.”
"Oh yes, the black soil business.
Most scholars outside the modern western cover-up establishment have rejected the false interpretation some have given to Kemet, ostensibly alluding the term Kemet to the alleged ”black soil”  of Egypt. There’s nothing in the term, outside the imagination of western myth-makers,  to suggest the Egyptians referred to the color of the soil or sand, rather than the people, in naming their country. Our position is consistent with the testimony of the ancient Greek writers, eyewitnesses who unanimously described the Egyptians as a black people, closely related to the ”Ethiopians”.”

And white Hollywood casts white actors and gives them tans.

*internal sobbing*

i will never not reblog this. i know too many people who for real dont think Egypt is a part of Africa.

KNOW YOUR HISTORY

OK. I’m going to go there.While this is laudable in highlighting Western so-called ‘whitewashing’, we need to be aware that ‘African’ ethnicity encompasses multiple cultures, tribal and genetic differences. Africa is a continent.Conversely, we need to be aware that the period we call Ancient Egypt was thousands of years in duration, with influxes of multiple peoples, immigrations and emigrations.
Populations were highly mobile, and modern framings of ethnicity are just that. To say that Ancient Egyptians were definitively of all one ethnicity (which have reduced to Black vs White) is just as dangerous and ridiculous as saying all Europeans are White, or all Asians have a particular skin colour.Ancient Egypt is on the edge of what might be called Deep Time - the period of human history when we cannot for certain say that we are absolutely correct in our theories of socal structure and identity.I’ve reblogged this post before in regards to the complexity of India in relation to ethnicity and culture, which highlights the variety of Proto Indo-European Peoples. The thing is, Africa is even more diverse than India.
Borders are porous and Africa is really fucking big. The erasure of POC from the narrative of history is a vile thing steeped in colonialism and racism. That’s why the notion of people realising that there were multiple ethnicities beyond Black and White and POC is important. It’s why we must be aware that Ancient Egyptian religion wasn’t simply the Osiris/Assr-cult we get fed by Bullfinch and others, but something with a history and differing cults that changed over time.By all means study your history, but understand that cultural identifiers are often way way more complex on the ground than historians and chroniclers might have you believe, to say nothing of the political dimensions of Egyptology, and the pet theories of academics.
In point of fact, the narratives constructed about ancient cultures are often constructed in the interests of oppressors, and the oppressor/oppressed dynamic often leaves both sides vying for some sense of legitimacy or justification.Let me reiterate: I’m not saying that Ancient Egyptians weren’t black. I’m saying they were from the African Continent, and North Africa contains and has contained many differing poples which we moderns insist on structuring in terms of ethnicity, when we can’t be sure they saw themselves that way.

coldalbion:

mulatoomcmxci:

steppauseturnpausepivotstepstep:

babybutta:

yarrahs-life:

high-power-prolific:

thehereticpharaoh:

People really don’t believe Ancient Egyptians were ethnically African?

They referred to themselves, not as ”Egyptians” (a Greek term) , but as ”Kemmui’’, meaning, ”the blacks”.

The country itself they called, Kemet, or black nation.

'Kem' is the term for black in the ancient Egyptian language. It is represented in hieroglyphs by a stick charred at both ends.”

"km.t, the name of Ancient Egypt in Egyptian; Egypt (Coptic: Kemi)

r n km.t, the native term for the Egyptian language

(Ref: The Egyptian Hieroglyphic Dictionary, Vols 1&2, E.A. Budge, Dover.) 

Note: words inside brackets are the determinatives or word classifiers along with their English meanings.

Kem, kame, kmi, kmem, kmom = to be black 

Kememu = Black people (Ancient Egyptians) in both Ancient and modern Egyptian (Kmemou).

Kem [khet][wood] = extremely black, jet-black

Kemet = any black thing. Note: “t” is silent - pronounced Kemé

Kemet [nu][community, settlement, nation] = Black nation = Ancient Egypt.  

Kemet [Romé][people] = Black people. Ancient Egyptians. 

Kemit [Shoit][books] = Black books, Ancient Egyptian literature.  

Kem wer [miri][large body of water] = The Great Black sea (The Red sea). This sea is neither black nor red, this is in reference to which nation, Black or Red, at a particular time, controlled this body of water. 

Kemi fer = Black double house; seat of government. Note: by reference to Wolof again, we know that to make a plural of per or house, the “p” becomes an “f” or fer. Thus fero=great houses (double), it is not pero as Budge writes.

In Ancient Egyptian, the ordinary adjective always follows the noun it modifies, whereas a sanctified adjective usually comes before its noun.  The sanctified adjectives are:

Kem —  Black

Suten -  Royal

Nter —-  Holy, Sacred

Examples:

Kem ti = Black image, sacred image : ti oubash = white image  

Kem ho = Black face/title of a god   : ho oubash = white face  

Kem ta = Black land, holy land        : Ta deshret = Red land (also; Ta Sett) 

This rule does not apply when Black is used as a noun-adjective of nationality:  

Hompt Kemet = copper of Black; Egyptian copper :  Hompt Sett = copper of the Red nations; Asiatic copper  

Ro in Kemet (page 416a) = speech of Black; mute ro n Kemet = word of the mouth of Black; the Egyptian language

Kemet Deshret = Black and Red; good and evil; fertile and barren, etc.; Duality  

Deshretu (page 554a,b) = red ones, red devils.  Used also to refer to the Namu and Tamhu; not a complimentary label. 

African Origins: 

The following Ancient Egyptian words acknowledge the origins of Pharaonic Egyptian civilization; 

Khentu Hon Nefer (page 554a) = founders of the Excellent Order. Budge: “peoples and tribes of Nubia and the Egyptian Sudan.” For “Hon” see page 586b. 

Hon Nefer (page 1024b) = Excellent Order

Kenus (page1024b) = mighty; brave (from Kenu, page 772a)

Ta Khent (page 1051b/page 554b) = land of the beginning.  

Eau (page 952b/page 17b) = the old country  

Ancient Egyptian’s Worldview:  

The Egyptian’s view of the world was the exact opposite of the current Western one. To the Egyptian, the top of the world was in the south (upper) towards the African interior, the bottom (lower) towards the north, hence upper and lower Egypt; upper and lower Syria.”

"Oh yes, the black soil business.

Most scholars outside the modern western cover-up establishment have rejected the false interpretation some have given to Kemet, ostensibly alluding the term Kemet to the alleged ”black soil”  of Egypt. There’s nothing in the term, outside the imagination of western myth-makers,  to suggest the Egyptians referred to the color of the soil or sand, rather than the people, in naming their country. Our position is consistent with the testimony of the ancient Greek writers, eyewitnesses who unanimously described the Egyptians as a black people, closely related to the ”Ethiopians”.”

And white Hollywood casts white actors and gives them tans.

*internal sobbing*

i will never not reblog this. i know too many people who for real dont think Egypt is a part of Africa.

KNOW YOUR HISTORY

OK. I’m going to go there.

While this is laudable in highlighting Western so-called ‘whitewashing’, we need to be aware that ‘African’ ethnicity encompasses multiple cultures, tribal and genetic differences. Africa is a continent.

Conversely, we need to be aware that the period we call Ancient Egypt was thousands of years in duration, with influxes of multiple peoples, immigrations and emigrations.

Populations were highly mobile, and modern framings of ethnicity are just that. To say that Ancient Egyptians were definitively of all one ethnicity (which have reduced to Black vs White) is just as dangerous and ridiculous as saying all Europeans are White, or all Asians have a particular skin colour.

Ancient Egypt is on the edge of what might be called Deep Time - the period of human history when we cannot for certain say that we are absolutely correct in our theories of socal structure and identity.

I’ve reblogged this post before in regards to the complexity of India in relation to ethnicity and culture, which highlights the variety of Proto Indo-European Peoples. The thing is, Africa is even more diverse than India.

Borders are porous and Africa is really fucking big. 

The erasure of POC from the narrative of history is a vile thing steeped in colonialism and racism. That’s why the notion of people realising that there were multiple ethnicities beyond Black and White and POC is important. It’s why we must be aware that Ancient Egyptian religion wasn’t simply the Osiris/Assr-cult we get fed by Bullfinch and others, but something with a history and differing cults that changed over time.

By all means study your history, but understand that cultural identifiers are often way way more complex on the ground than historians and chroniclers might have you believe, to say nothing of the political dimensions of Egyptology, and the pet theories of academics.

In point of fact, the narratives constructed about ancient cultures are often constructed in the interests of oppressors, and the oppressor/oppressed dynamic often leaves both sides vying for some sense of legitimacy or justification.

Let me reiterate: I’m not saying that Ancient Egyptians weren’t black. I’m saying they were from the African Continent, and North Africa contains and has contained many differing poples which we moderns insist on structuring in terms of ethnicity, when we can’t be sure they saw themselves that way.


Text

Sep 1, 2014
@ 9:43 pm
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29,378 notes

perfectlydreadful:

White People: The Middle East is so barbaric. They’ll cut off a person’s hand just for stealing!

White People when an unarmed black kid is murdered by police in America: Yeah, but he shoplifted some cigarillos, so…

(via daughter-of-varda)


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Sep 1, 2014
@ 9:42 pm
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203 notes

fucktheory:

Happy Labor Day!

fucktheory:

Happy Labor Day!


Link

Sep 1, 2014
@ 8:57 pm
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2 notes

Human rights justice blocked for Aboriginal women »

One factor that was consistently raised is that many Aboriginal women are often discouraged by the prospect of having to challenge the police, or powerful members of their communities on whom they depend for their livelihoods. 

Retaliation can take many forms, the Canadian Human Rights Commission was told. Some Aboriginal women said they fear that by making a complaint they could be denied access to important health and social services. Others spoke of fears that their allegations would be met with intimidation or acts of violence. Some said they face the difficult decision of choosing between keeping quiet or leaving their community.

“Truth be told, some leaders are offenders of violence against women,” one participant said. “It is so entrenched, many women live in fear. That is our sad reality, and it is tough.”


Link

Sep 1, 2014
@ 8:31 pm
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Rotherham child sex abuse: it is our duty to ask difficult questions »

One of the terrifying effects of the non-contemporaneity of different levels of social life is the rise of violence against women – not just random violence, but systematic violence, violence that is specific to a certain social context, follows a pattern and transmits a clear message.


Photoset

Sep 1, 2014
@ 7:06 pm
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234 notes

cypress369:

mortisia:

Minoan civilization
[source]

The Minoan civilization was an Aegean Bronze Age civilization that arose on the island of Crete and flourished from approximately the 27th century BC to the 15th century BC. It was rediscovered at the beginning of the 20th century through the work of British archaeologist Arthur Evans. Will Durant referred to it as "the first link in the European chain." The early inhabitants of Crete settled as early as 128,000 BC, during the Middle Paleolithic age. It was not until 5000 BC that the first signs of advanced agriculture appeared, marking the beginning of civilization. The Minoan culture was established by the 27th century BC.

The Minoans seem to have worshipped primarily goddesses, and their culture has been described as being based on a “matriarchal religion.”[40][41] These include a Mother Goddess of fertility, a Mistress of the Animals, a protectress of cities, the household, the harvest, and the underworld, and more. A major festive celebration was exemplified in the famous athletic Minoan bull dance, represented at large in the frescoes of Knossos[42] and inscribed in miniature seals.[43]

Though the vision created by Arthur Evans of a Pax Minoica, a “Minoan peace”, has been criticised in recent years,[46] it is generally assumed there was little internal armed conflict in Minoan Crete itself, until the following Mycenaean period.[47] The Minoan cities were connected with stone-paved roads, formed from blocks cut with bronze saws. Streets were drained and water and sewer facilities were available to the upper class, through clay pipes.[53]

The Minoans raised cattlesheeppigs, and goats, and grew wheatbarleyvetch, and chickpeas, they also cultivated grapesfigs, and olives, and grew poppies, for poppyseed and, perhaps, opium. The Minoans also domesticated bees.[59] Crops including lettuce, celery, asparagus and carrots grow wild in Crete. Pear, quince, and olive trees were also native. The people imported date palm trees, and cats (used for hunting purposes) from Egypt.[60] They developed Mediterranean polyculture,[61] the practice of growing more than one crop at a time. Their more varied and healthy diet resulted in the growth of population. Theoretically this method of farming would maintain the fertility of the soil, as well as offer protection against low yields in any single crop. 

The Minoan eruption on the island of Thera (present-day Santorini about 100 km distant from Crete) occurred during the LM IA period. This eruption was among the largest volcanic explosions in the history of civilization. The eruption devastated the nearby Minoan settlement at Akrotiri on Santorini, which was entombed in a layer of pumice.[70] Also, scholars suggest that the eruption and its effect on the Minoan civilization may have been the origin of the Atlantis myth, via Egyptian historical accounts.


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Sep 1, 2014
@ 6:37 pm
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18 notes

Hellenic Polytheism Book Review Pt 3 »

bayoread:

Kharis: Hellenic Polytheism Explored - Sarah Kate Istra Winter

Paperback: 157 pages.
Published: First edition, 2004. Second edition, 2008. Cafepress.
ISBN: 978-1438231921

Main Chapters:

Kharis: Definitions
Introduction
Notes on Language

Chapter One. Ancient Greek Religion - The Myths,…


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Sep 1, 2014
@ 6:07 pm
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461 notes

kushl0rd:

vsthepomegranate:

Earth Wind and Fire

dat Occult

kushl0rd:

vsthepomegranate:

Earth Wind and Fire

dat Occult


Photoset

Sep 1, 2014
@ 5:38 pm
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1,150 notes

myampgoesto11:

Outdoor sculptures by Joaquin Jara

see more here

My Amp Goes To 11Twitter | Instagram

(via future-imp3rfect)


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Sep 1, 2014
@ 5:34 pm
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56 notes

Actual Witchcraft on the Witchcraft Blog. »

rootandrock:

Though it’s often said that dead wood is devoid of the spirit of the plant, I don’t always think this is true. Secondary to this one can conjure the spirit back into it, and render the point mostly-sorta-moot anyway (also true for wood which was cut-live, but improperly and arrives to you “dead”).